Volume 57 (3) — July 2008

Hydrology for water management

Feature articles

line


waterdrop
 

Hydrology and water resources within WMO—the birth of a Programme

Sociologists debate at great length the relevant importance of hereditary and environmental factors in the development of human beings. Likewise, much can be said on the relative significance for an institution of what it inherits from its origins and the scientific and administrative environment in which it has developed over the years.

MoreView as pdf

line

lake
 

Evolving role of WMO in hydrology and water resources management

In the late 1950s, the time when the Commission for Hydrology was coming into being, our world was very different. There were several thousand million fewer people living on the globe and nature was much more “natural” than today.

MoreView as pdf

line

stream
 

Capacity-building needs for National Hydrological Services

In broad terms, a hydrological service is an institution whose core business is the provision of information about the water (or hydrological) cycle and the status and trends of a country’s water resources.

MoreView as pdf

line

lake
 

The imperative of water resources assessment

As populations grow and economies expand, competition for water to meet household, municipal, agricultural and industrial needs continuously increases. Moreover, laws and regulations aimed at keeping water in rivers and streams to meet environmental and recreational objectives are similarly increasing.

MoreView as pdf

line

bridge
 

Developments in hydrometric technology: new and emerging instruments for mapping river hydrodynamics

New demands on surface-water resources from an increasing world population and rising global living standards are requiring water managers to improve river flow measurements. Water managers are requiring flow instrumentation to measure those resources more accurately, in more detail and at lesser cost.

MoreView as pdf

line

cloud
 

Understanding the hydrological cycle: key to sustainable development

The term “sustainable development” refers to economic and social development enabling current needs to be met without compromising the ability of future generations to meet theirs, as defined in the “Brundtland report” submitted to the United Nations General Assembly in 1987 by the World Commission on Environment and Development.

MoreView as pdf

line

dam
 

Short- and medium-term climate information for water management

Water managers and engineers sometimes make use of climate information and predictions at a range of temporal and spatial scales, and at other times use their own techniques to account for climate variability. In the longer term, the impacts of global warming will become of greater interest to water managers, as will improved short- and medium-term climate and hydrological predictions.

MoreView as pdf

line

water pipe
 

New challenges of water resources management: the future role of CHy

Karl Hofius in his article in this issue of the Bulletin entitled “Evolving role of WMO in hydrology and water resources management” ably describes the evolution of the Hydrology and Water Resources Programme in WMO over the past 50 years. These developments have seen the integration of operational hydrology into the activities of WMO and the recognition of this through the adoption of the slogan “Weather, climate and water” for WMO.

MoreView as pdf

line
     
     
     
     

Other feature articles are to be found in MeteoWorld.

back to top

 

 

 

 

 

 


Download
   
  Latest issue [pdf]
 
Regular features
  In this issue
  Obituaries
  WMO Secretariat news
  50 years ago
  WMO Bulletin: the first 50 years
  WMO Bulletin interviews

  Archive



Copyright | Privacy policy | Disclaimer | Guidelines |